All posts by Jana Snyder

25 Ways to Nurture Yourself

woman walking outdoors for self-care

One of the main reasons we do emotional eating is because we’re feeling stretched to the breaking point. One of the best ways to combat that is with regular, intentional self care.

But many of us don’t know how to do that. And in fact, we may be used to thinking of food and drink indulgences as “self care.” Yeah, it can make you feel better in the short run, but it doesn’t help turn your heart and mind in a more positive direction.

We often think that the most efficient way to fix our disordered eating is by attacking the eating part of the cycle. But in reality, the most effective way to turn the tide is to begin to practice regular self care, which helps even out our emotions and stop the cycle of self-punishment. (I’ve written about this before: 5 steps to address emotional eating; How emotional eating keeps you stuck.)

Here are 25 ways to practice self-care — and only one of them involves food!

self care tip; schedule a date with the sunset

  1. Schedule yourself a daily appointment to watch the sunrise or sunset.
  2. Go for a goal-free walk at your favorite time of day.
  3. Wander a flea market, book store, garden center, or hardware store. Your choice.
  4. Put your phone on airplane mode for an hour or two.
  5. Add to your gratitude journal – or start one.
  6. Play with your favorite child or pet.
  7. Take a guilt-free nap.
  8. Organize something. foliage in vase
  9. Wander a garden.
  10. Meditate.
  11. Re-read old journal entries.
  12. Write without expectations or self-criticism.
  13. Read an old favorite book.
  14. Forgive someone. You might start with yourself.
  15. Make found poetry.
  16. Watch inspiring videos. Or funny ones, that just make you laugh.
  17. Dance to your favorites.
  18. Cook something that pleases your soul and nourishes your body.
  19. Spend time in a hammock or lounge chair (weather permitting). Tune into the sounds of nature around you.
  20. Go stargazing; get out of the city, if necessary.
  21. Harvest some flowers and/or foliage from your yard, if possible. Arrange them.
  22. Schedule time with an authentic friend.
  23. Read some Psalms and pray.
  24. Take a soaking bath while listening to a favorite book, podcast, or music. (With favorite scents in the water or in a candle, if that’s your thing.)
  25. Get to bed in time to get eight hours of sleep.

What are your favorite ways to practice self care? Have you seen it make a difference in your health?

25 ways to practice self care

Thanks to my Instagram friends for adding to this list:  @afreshattitude, @cheesegirlpa, @corinnescleanjourney, @lynettesart, @my_crazy_low_carb_life

 

Photos:

Woman outdoors: by Alexandre Croussette on Unsplash

Kansas sunset: by Jana Snyder

Foliage in vase: by Heather Mount on Unsplash

Blueberry cheesecake fat bombs

blueberry cheesecake fat bombs

A picture of this sugar-free keto treat has been in my @jana.realfood account on Instagram for a while, and people keep commenting,”Where’s the recipe for those blueberry cheesecake fat bombs? I want to make them!” So finally I got the hint: here’s the recipe!

 

Blueberry cheesecake fat bombs recipe

.

2/3 cup blueberries, fresh or frozen (strawberries or raspberries would probably work great, too!)

8 ounces cream cheese

1/3 cup coconut oil

1 teaspoon lemon juice (or more, to your taste)

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

5 drops plain or vanilla stevia extract (omit, or add more, to your liking)

3 dashes of salt

 

Allow the cream cheese to come to room temperature for 30 to 60 minutes, until softened.

If using fresh berries, wash them and remove the stems. Frozen berries work fine, too. Just make sure they’re sugar-free!

blueberries - fresh and frozen

If using frozen berries, let them sit at room temp for 10 or 15 minutes before blending.

Combine all ingredients using an immersion blender* or food processor, and mix until well combined. Taste, and adjust lemon juice and/or sweetener to your preference. This amount makes for a very subtle flavor. If you like a stronger lemon flavor (I do!), you may want to add quite a bit more.

Spoon the mixture into small muffin silicon molds or candy molds*. Place in the freezer for about 2 hours, or until set.

Pop them out and store in a bag in the freezer. Enjoy!

…………………………………….

*Equipment I recommend

This is the immersion blender I use and love. It comes with a blender attachment, a whisk attachment, and a carafe. So handy for making whipped cream. And essential for homemade mayo, or dump ranch dressing!

Here’s a cheaper version. Just a blender, no whisk or carafe.

Here’s the candy mold I use for fat bombs. (This is not what’s shown in the picture.)

Please note: These are Amazon affiliate links; if you buy something through them, I will get a li’l something from Amazon, with no additional cost to you. 🙂

blueberry cheesecake fat bombs

Who should limit carbs, and why?

sndbite-why-limit-carbs

Now that you know what carbs are to your body, and what carbs are on your plate, this will help you understand how they matter to your health, and whether or not you might benefit from limiting your intake. (Oh, and by the way: sugar is a carb!)

(4.75 minutes)

Related things you may find helpful:

Small steps to big change: 10 simple diet hacks to cut down sugar and carbs (ebook you get free when you subscribe to my newsletter)

Recipes – scroll down to find “SUGAR FREE TREATS”

How to make zoodles – grain-free, fast-and-easy zucchini noodles

A low-carb substitute for mashed potatoes

click to go to soundbites index

 

2-minute grain-free biscuit/English muffin (Paleo, Keto, gluten-free, Whole30 friendly)

Paleo, Keto, grain-free, gluten-free English muffin

If you’re committed to living a gluten-free, grain-free, Paleo, low-carb, or ketogenic lifestyle, one of the hardest things to live without is bread — right?! You’re gonna love this: this Paleo/Keto biscuit recipe fits all those requirements AND it involves one bowl, a minute or so of whisking with a fork, and less than two minutes in the microwave. So easy! You can also use it to make avocado toast or strawberry shortcake!

It looks like an English muffin, but the texture is really more like a biscuit. It’s so quick and simple, and helps round out so many meals, it’s earned a permanent spot in my recipe file. Just know that it doesn’t have a lot of flavor on its own — definitely a supporting player. So you’re probably going to want to enhance it with other flavorings — notes on that follow the recipe.

Note/Update 8/16/18: I’ve improved this recipe since the original post. The instructions below now contain what I think is a much more fool-proof version.

Paleo biscuit / English muffin recipe

3 Tablespoons fine blanched almond flour

1 Tablespoon coconut flour

1/4 teaspoon baking powder

1/8 teaspoon kosher salt

1 egg

1 teaspoon avocado oil or melted coconut oil

 

In a cereal or soup bowl, stir together the dry ingredients, then push them to one side of the bowl.

Place the egg and oil in the empty spot and whisk with a fork till well blended. Then stir the wet and dry together till it’s all the same consistency. It will be about as thick as wet mashed potatoes, or thick cornbread batter.

Grease a 7 oz ramekin. UPDATE: You can still cook it in a ramekin, but I’ve found that a tall coffee mug with parallel sides works nicely, too, and you get a little taller result with a flatter bottom. (I love this chemical-free, soy-free avocado oil spray from  Chosen Foods.) Put all the batter in the ramekin or mug, even out the top, and microwave for one and a half minutes.

dish + spray for Paleo Keto English muffin

The ramekin may be hot! If using a coffee mug, just grab the handle. After removing it from the microwave, turn the muffin out and let it sit till cool enough to handle. If the top is lumpy, just slice that bit off, for even toasting. Slice horizontally into halves or thirds, and let some of the steam escape before toasting. Toasting can be done in a toaster or oven, but toasting is essential to get a nice golden crust, for both visual appeal and texture.

Ways to use it (and enhance the flavor):

Paleo, Keto, gluten-free English muffin with chia seed jam

  • Spread with one or more of your favorite toppings — butter, ghee, cinnamon, nut butter,  sugar-free jam. (I like this chia seed jam from The Kitchn.) Of course, avocado toast is also the bomb!

Paleo keto avocado toast

  • For garlic toast, toast it lightly first, then spread with butter and garlic salt, and broil till you like the color. Watch it closely!
  • Serve it toasted but untopped, along with some good olive oil to dip it in. Better yet, enhance the olive oil with balsamic vinegar, roasted garlic, or your favorite seasoning blend. We like it with zaatar.
  • Also a great accompaniment for soup or any dish that wants its sauce sopped up with bread!
  • You can try it as a sandwich bread: I find it too dense for this, but you may disagree.  🙂
  • I’ve also used it as the shortbread-biscuit component in my family’s version of strawberry shortcake. (Don’t expect pound cake: this is truly strawberry shortbread.) Toast in the toaster, then crumble into a small bowl. Top with macerated strawberries, drizzle with some cream, half-and-half, or coconut milk. You can also top it with whipped cream if you like. Or instead of the crumble, stack it up…

keto strawberry shortcake

Enjoy!

Note: Inspired by this recipe from Running to the Kitchen, but I’ve tweaked the recipe to make it a one-bowl deal, and to make the muffin a bit less soggy. See her original for a cinnamon-raisin version (not so keto-friendly).

Which foods are carbs?

Question; Which foods are carbs

If you’re confused as to which foods are carbs and which ones aren’t, this should help clear things up.

Related things you may find helpful:

How to make zoodles – grain-free, fast-and-easy zucchini noodles

A low-carb substitute for mashed potatoes

Small steps to big change: 10 simple diet hacks to cut down sugar and carbs (ebook you get free when you subscribe to my newsletter)

Recipes – scroll down to find “SUGAR FREE TREATS”

click to go to soundbites index

Real food vs man made (or ultra-processed) food

real food vs man-made food (aka, ultra-processed food)

What do I mean when I talk about “real food” vs “man made food”? And why real food matters.

 

(5 minutes)

 

Other things you may find helpful:

A list of real foods, gray-area foods, and foods to avoid (downloadable 1-page pdf)

Organic, etc. – What U.S. food labeling terms mean

Making real food a part of your real life – how to make it work: an e-book that captures my most important tips for making real food work for you

The miraculous factory: you! – This topic in more detail.

click to go to soundbites index

 

It’s not healthy to give up a whole food group! (Is it?)

You shouldn't give up a whole food group

When you start talking about elimination diets, a common objection is that it’s not healthy to give up a whole food group. But have you ever stopped to think: What defines a “food group”? Click to listen…

Other things you may find helpful:

4 things you need to UNlearn about nutrition

What are carbs, fat, and protein? (the scientific perspective)

Separating diet fact from fiction (all my posts on nutrition)

Why some foods are more addictive

click to go to soundbites index